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Report of the Digital Government Review


Components: some of the architecture already exists

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As well as Identity Assurance there are a number of other components either already in existence or being developed. We have touched on some of them before:

  • The Public Services Network (PSN) that provides a common approach to voice and data connectivity across the public sector [144]
  • The GOV.UK publishing platform for presenting content and services online
  • The GOV.UK performance platform for reporting on service performance
  • The Government Digital Service’s Service Design Manual
  • The National Information Infrastructure (NII)
  • The local government data schemas supported by the Local Government Association (LGA)

Although we are not aware of an authoritative list we are sure that this could be developed over time [145].

Some components in the list above are software, some are hardware, some are data/information, and others are processes. This mix of types of component is common in architectural models used in other sectors [146]. The blueprint for a future city that we described in an earlier chapter is also part of this world and would map to a well-defined architecture.

[144] https://www.gov.uk/public-services-network, the NHS has its own standard N3 http://n3.nhs.uk
[145] Here is an example from central government https://gds.blog.gov.uk/2014/08/22/how-sharing-helps-us-improve-digital-services/. Meanwhile this site was built to make sharing easier in local government: http://www.civicexchange.eu/apps
[146] Those who love detailed architectures may wish to look at the TMForum Frameworx guidelines for telecoms operator’s business, software and information architectures. We would not recommend anything quite so detailed but it is interesting to see what has evolved in other sectors.

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